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Montauk Point Lighthouse

Montauk Point Lighthouse

Built somewhere around 1796, the Montauk Lighthouse is located near east Long Island, on Block Island Sound. The lighthouse is the 4th oldest (and still active) in the US. The complete structure stands at a massive 110-feet and resides inside the famous Montauk Point State Park. The beacon from the lighthouse is programmed to flash every five seconds. Amazingly, its beacon can easily be seen as far as 19 nautical miles. Fortunately, for those who wish to see and feel the lighthouse in all its glory, the structure is accessible and you can go for a trip to the history sandstone lighthouse through different modes of transportation.

 

A Brief Historical Account of the Montauk Lighthouse

During the Second World War, the United States army took over the lighthouse to mount a coastal defense unit. There were three civilian maintenance keepers of the lighthouse, all of whom went home in 1943. Right beside the Montauk Lighthouse, the US army opened Camp Hero, which was back in 1942.

 

Just a year after the Second World War ended, the USCG (United States Coastal Guard) took over the lighthouse as primary keepers. They ran the lighthouse up until 1987, which was when it was fully automated. In May of the same year, the Montauk Historical Society inaugurated the lighthouse museum, and opened it for the public.

 

When Should You Visit the Lighthouse?

You can take an exciting tour of the lighthouse from mid May to the second week of October; this is when tours are available daily. After October, you can visit the lighthouse on weekends beginning from the mid of March to late April as well as in November.

 

You can take a tour of the iconic Montauk Point Lighthouse through the keeper’s cottage which was built somewhere around the 1860s. You can even climb to the top of the lighthouse, but you are going to have to climb the spiral, 137-step staircase.

 

Modes of Transportation

Driving to the Lighthouse

You can drive to the lighthouse from Hamlet, Montauk (the lighthouse is 6.5 miles east of Hamlet). The easiest way to get there is through the New York State Route 27. You will be able to see the lighthouse at the loop of the highway. If you’re coming from New Jersey, you can take interstate 495 (the Long Island Expressway), come out from Exit 70 on Manorville Road and then just drive south.

 

Taking the Train or Bus

During peak season, which basically starts from July and ends in September, you can take the shuttle to Montauk Lighthouse, courtesy of the Suffolk County Transit. It’s a two-way trip and the ticket prices are reasonable. If you are a student or a senior, you can get some discounts. For kids below the age of five, the ride is basically free. The shuttle bus service runs from Monday all through Saturday, and there are eight trips per day scheduled.

 

Take a Boat Ride to the Lighthouse

If you want to see the lighthouse from the water, various boat charter companies schedule rides to Montauk Island during the summer. You can even charter a boat just before sunset and turn it into a romantic trip. Sit back and enjoy the view of the lighthouse while the sun sets. There are plenty of charter companies you can opt for such as the Montauk Yacht Club, Viking Fleet Charters, Runway Charters, etc. Although some companies will provide you with light snacks and beverages, it’s still better to pack your own food and drinks.

 

 

So there you go, everything you need to know about the Montauk Point Lighthouse and getting to the structure. Have you visited it recently, or at all?

Haunted Houses on Long Island

Haunted Houses on Long Island

Long Island is often associated with plenty of scary folk tales, unusual myths and ancient folklore. Moreover, the city has a rich heritage and history as it was first populated by Native American Indians. It was in the 1600s that European immigrants started inhabiting the land.

As a result, the city has plenty of ancient sites and Native American burial grounds along with landmarks important to the Revolutionary War. Moreover, Long Island also has a slew of glamorous mansions and huge estates for added measure.

You already know how this sounds like – a good way to see some haunted mansions! If you are interested in having the fright of your life, mentioned below are some of the most haunted houses in Long Island.

The Amityville House 

When it comes to haunted houses, there is no way we couldn’t mention this popular haunted house in the city. Located in Amityville, many people know about story of the family that was straight up murdered in this house! It all started in 1974, when Ronal DeFeo slaughtered his family in the house.  A lot of people believed that the vile spirits haunting the house drove Ronald completely mad, and led him to murdering his entire family.

In 1975, the house was bought by George and Kathy Lutz. Just a year after the murders occurred, the couple spawned a series of ghastly tales about bizarre, paranormal activities that they “claimed” to experience. Their stories led to several movie productions soon after. However, their stores were later revealed to be nothing but a hoax. But there are still many people who believe ghosts haunt the Amityville house.

Winfield Hall

This former manor has seen plenty of death. However, as per local legends, there are some pretty colorful tales about the owner of the mansion, Frank Winfield Woolworth. But there are also some stories about bizarre occult activity as well. You see, just two years after Winfield had the former mansion built, which was in 1917, he passed away. Sadly, just a couple of years after Frank Winfield’s death, his daughter Edna, committed suicide.

Fast forward to the sixties and seventies, the Winfield mansion served as a home to Air Career School, where students were reported saying that Edna’s room was always kept locked and no one dared to go inside. Moreover, the students also stated that they could hear sounds of moving furniture coming from the room. But there was nobody in the room!

Morgan Hall

Located in Glen Cove, Morgan Hall was built by the famous millionaire J.P. Morgan back in 1910. However, today, Morgan Hall is said to be one of the most haunted and creepiest places in Long Island! People claim that the mansion is haunted by the ghost of the financial tycoon’s daughter, Alice who passed away in the house due to the yellow fever.

Before being transformed into a Catholic school back in the sixties, the former mansion also served as a Russian Embassy. After the school was built, people have claimed seeing the ghost of Alice roaming around the attic as well as the school’s numerous halls and corridors. According to eyewitness accounts, Alice is always dressed in a black gown. Dare to meet her?

Fire Island Lighthouse

Located on Fire Island, the Fire Island Lighthouse stands at 74-feet and was built in 1826. However, thirty-two years later, the original lighthouse was torn down and replaced by the current one. And this lighthouse is rumored to be one of the most haunted places in Long Island.

According to folklore, the lighthouse is haunted by the ghost of a curator, who committed suicide. He died inside the lighthouse. The curator committed suicide, grief stricken by the death of his daughter, who passed away during the construction of the lighthouse. People have been reported as saying they could hear the sound of eerie laughter coming out from the lighthouse. Many others have reported seeing a vague, shadowy figure of a man carrying rope.

So there you go, a list of some of the most haunted places in Long Island, perfect for a Halloween trip with your friends. Or basically any other night as well!

October Fun on Long Island

October Fun on Long Island

Visiting Long Island during October will make for a scintillating experience. The weather is a mildly cold, perfect for having some fun outdoors! There are just so many things you can do apart from enjoying the beautiful fall colors.

Although the temperature will remain in the mid-range, if you do plan for outdoorsy activities on Long Island, it’s important to wear a couple of layers and bring a pair of hiking boots or shoes, especially if you want to experience the botanical garden in all its glory. Mentioned below are some interesting and exciting activities you can do.

Beautiful Long Island Landscape Hike

If you want to go out for a long, yet exhilarating and mentally stimulating hike, then Long Island is just the place. There are a variety of amazing trails that you could go on, for example, the Garvies Point Preserve. The preserve will nicely lead you down towards a pristine beach where you can take a breather and enjoy a mini picnic.

Moreover, Garvies also has spectacular refuges for wildlife in Long Island, like the Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge. You can hike down to this national wildlife refuge, go to the shoreline and experience a huge gathering of different waterfowl.

Apple Hunting and Picking

As soon as fall hits Long Island, the place becomes an apple haven. There are a variety of orchards open to the public. You can go there with your family to pick hordes of fresh apples right at their peak. You can hunt for as many apples as you want and either eat them raw or make some fresh juice. There is no shortage of delicious recipes that have apples as the main ingredient.

Similarly, there are different farms of different fruits such as pumpkins, raspberries, blueberries, blackberries corn, tomatoes, strawberries, peaches, etc. However, each harvest will depend on the time of the year, apple picking is great for October.

Look for Your Own Pumpkin

There are also plenty of pumpkin farms you can visit on Long Island, and some of the farms also feature corn mazes as well as pre and post Halloween events. While you can buy already-picked pumpkins for Halloween, there are also farms where you can go out for some pumpkin picking. You might end up picking the biggest pumpkin on the farm!

One of the most popular pumpkin picking farms on Long Island is Brightwater’s, located near Bay Shore. If you want to pick organic pumpkins, then you can go to Organics Today, which is a 3-acre farm. If you want to experience the thrill of navigating through a corn maze, you can head straight to Fairview Farm located in Bridgehampton.

A Weekend Escape in Long Island

Another great way to enjoy a fall weekend in Long Island is visiting the popular Glen Cove Mansion. The mansion was built back in 1910 and is an award-winning structure. You could also go to the iconic Oheka Castle, located in Huntington.

You could also plan a weekend getaway for some wine tasting at the popular Long Island Wine Country or visit the Hamptons (you would really enjoy it since all the summer crowd is already gone). The Long Island Wine Country features serene bike trails and cozy villages.

Have Some Fun with Your Pooch

If you have brought your canine companion along for a visit to Long Island, you would be relieved to know that there are several places designated for dogs, you can play with your pooch all day long or take him for some exploration. Plus, there are also off-leash parks and places where your dog can run wild.

 

 

So, there you have it – some of the best places to visit and fun things to do while you are in Long Island this fall. Some amazing October fun on Long Island for locals and tourists alike.

Sagamore Hill National Historic Site” The Summer White House”

Sagamore Hill National Historic Site” The Summer White House”

Do you want to have a feel of the daily life of a president? Have you been trying to figure out what the home of a president looks like?

Then Sagamore Hill National Historic site is definitely, the place to be. Located in Cove Neck, New York, near Oyster Bay in Nassau County, Sagamore Hill was the home of US President, Theodore Roosevelt.

Sitting on an 83.02 acres (33.60 ha) land, the 22-room house built in 1886, comes with several fascinating facilities.
The exquisite nature of the summer home was a center of attraction internationally even during the life of the president.
Ultimately becoming known as the “Summer White House” Sagamore Hill, hosted several dignitaries across the world from 1902 to 1908, during Roosevelt’s tenure as president.

More than four decades after the death of Roosevelt, Congress on July 25, 1962, formed The Sagamore Hill National Historic Site aimed at preserving the house as a unit of the National Park Service. On October 15, 1966, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

A visit to the site is never a waste of time. The natural surroundings of the area gives you a clue of what nature has to offer. By the time you leave there, you would be inspired to achieve more and learn more about the life of the 26th President of the United States.

You will have a feel of the original items the president used since almost all the furnishings are the originals.
The originality of the site takes you down memory lane, as to the items and artifacts people in the late eighteen hundreds used.

Sagamore Hill also hosts The Theodore Roosevelt Museum housed in the “Old Orchard” built in 1938. The museum contains records of the life and career of Roosevelt. There are also plaques with information about the home and the family as you tour.

What to expect
Sagamore Hill just like other tourist sites is open to the public by guided tour from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. There are tour guides readily available to take visitors around the home and provide them with all the needed information.

Ticket Purchasing
Visitors to the site can purchase tickets at the Old Orchard Museum & Visitor Center. Buy your ticket at 9:00 AM at the Visitor Center from Wednesday through Saturday. During the summer, the site is open seven days throughout the week.

Admission to the Roosevelt Museum at Old Orchard is, FREE, and opens from Wednesday to Sunday, 10:00 am to 4:00 pm.
It is worth noting that tickets are limited and sold on first come first served basis. Therefore, visitors must always arrive early, especially during weekends.
For more information visit the National Park Service Sagamore Hill website or call 516-922-4788.

Cradle of Aviation in Garden City

Cradle of Aviation in Garden City

As we journey through our Aviation history and monuments, our next stop is none other than The Cradle of Aviation.

Undoubtedly, The Cradle of Aviation Museum, in Long Island is another big thing when it comes to the preservation of aviation monuments.
Located in Garden City, east of New York City’s Long Island, The Cradle of Aviation Air and Space Museum maintains a wide range of aircrafts, artifacts, and aviation feats. This makes the site a must-see for aviation enthusiasts and persons seeking knowledge about American aviation history.

The architecture of the museum, a vast glass-enclosed building, is itself an attraction to visitors. The 150,000 square foot structure resembling a spacecraft, maintains exhibits including hot air balloon and Apollo lunar module.

You may be wondering how the museum earned the name “Cradle of Aviation.” Well, you can get the answer to your question when you visit the museum. But let me gist you with a little info.
Long Island earned the nickname, Cradle of Aviation in the 1920s. The name stems from the natural flying environment of Long Island. The area is flat and virtually treeless making it suitable for aviation activities. About 20 aircraft manufacturers operated in Long Islands between 1918 to 1938. In 1927, Charles Lindbergh flew from Long Island to Paris.

Museum’s History
The famous Cradle of Aviation Museum started as a dream of George C. Dade, Henry Anholzer of Pan American Airlines and other volunteers.
To achieve the dream of creating an aviation museum, they started acquiring and restoring aircrafts. The first acquisition was a World War I Curtiss JN-4D, discovered by Dade in an Iowa pig barn in 1973. Subsequent acquisitions include a Grumman Lunar Module spacecraft, Republic Seabee, Republic P-47N Thunderbolt, and Grumman F-11A Tiger.
The aircrafts occupied hangars 3 & 4 of the Mitchel Air Force Base. Nassau Country purchased these hangers when Mitchel Air Force Base closed in 1961.
In 1980, the Museum ultimately opened with few aircraft and Dade as its first director.

The Cradle of Aviation Museum closed in the 1990s to undergo a massive expansion and face lift program.

The hangers, which had received no form of renovation before the museum’s opening were refurbished. The museum re-opened in 2002, in a massive and state-of-the-art facility.

What makes the Cradle of Aviation Museum more interesting is the variety of offers visitors are treated to. Visitors can have access to the cockpits of exhibiting aircraft and watch short films.
Aside from aircraft viewing, you can watch virtual reality shows on space travel, the solar system, and the night sky. With volunteer docents ever ready to serve their guest, you can ask any question about items on display. You can also learn more about aviation by signing up for a space lab live astronomy in the dome theater.

Nassau County Firefighter’s Museum and Education CenterThe Cradle of Aviation Museum also hosts the almost 10,000 square foot Nassau County Firefighter’s Museum and Education Center. There, visitors can acquire historical information on fire fighting. On display are antique and contemporary fire apparatus spanning the history of firefighting in Nassau County.
The facility house the JET BLUE DOME theatre that features IMAX 70 millimeter format films. It also hosts a state-of-the-art digital planetarium and The Red Planet Cafe, which is decorated to resemble a space station on Mars.

 

 

Open days

The Cradle of Aviation Museum opens from Tuesday to Sunday from 9:30 am – 5 pm.

The Reckson Visitor Center Atrium serves as the main entrance to the museum.

Visitors have access to the facility on a guided tour.

Admission
Museum
Adult $15
Child/Senior* $13
Planetarium & Dome Theater Shows
Adult $9
Child/Senior* $8
Museum and Show Combo
Adult $20
Child/Senior* $18
Combo includes the museum and a single Planetarium or Dome Theater show.
*Children ages 2-12, Senior Citizens 62+, Military Personnel, Volunteer Firemen & Non-Ambulatory Visitors
Other Options
Junior Jet Club $2.50
Nunley’s Carousel $2

Nassau County Museum of Art

Nassau County Museum of Art

Nassau County Museum of Art

History and art are the next best thing to knowing and understanding our beginnings. What
better way of preserving our heritage than in a museum. Now, I know most of the
millennials think museums are a waste of time, and the internet makes everything so much
easier for us.
However, taking a trip down memory lane, is a much better experience than hitting the
search button. That is what the Nassau County Museum of Art offers. A place full of culture
and so much history, it’s like being back in time, and yet, still in the 21 st Century.
Museum Beginning
William Cullen was the original sole owner of the estate. Cullen was a patron of the arts,
poet, lawyer and political activist. In 1900, Lloyd Stephens Bryce purchased Bryant’s Upland
Farm and commissioned the architect Ogden Codman, Jr. to design Bryce House, on an
elevated site, overlooking Hempstead Harbor. Nassau County Museum of Art is that house.
In 1969, four years after the last owner, Childs Frick passed, the estate was purchased by
Nassau County with the goal of establishing the Nassau County Museum of Fine Art,
administered by the county’s Office of Cultural Development. The Museum became a
private not-for-profit institution in 1989, and is now governed and funded by a private
board of trustees.
The 145 acres surrounding Nassau County of Art is designated as a nature preserve. Marion
Cruger Coffin, a member of the American Institute of Landscape Architects, initially designed
the beautiful landscape in 1925. The original blueprints of this beautiful landscape are
housed in the Museum’s archives, along with photographs of the garden, taken in the
1930s.

The Museum

Located about 25 miles east of New York City, in Roslyn Harbor, Long Island, Nassau County
Museum of Art’s main building, is a three-story Georgian mansion. Designed in the Gold
Coast architecture of the late 19th century. Nassau County Museum of Art also houses the
Sculpture Park, architecturally-significant restored trellis, rare tree specimens, marked
walking trails, and the Formal Garden.
Considered among the nation’s largest, most important suburban art museums, Nassau
County Museum of Art strives to expand the understanding of art and culture through
exhibition and educational programs for people of all ages and backgrounds.
Exhibits
Over 500 permanent collections from both American and European art are housed by the
museum. The collection encompasses both 19 th and 20 th century art pieces through many
generous contributions. The Nassau County Museum of Art also presents yearly rotating art
exhibitions, many of which originate from their collection.
Edouard Vuillard, Pierre Bonnard, Roy Lichtenstein, Larry Rivers, Chaim Gross, Robert
Rauschenberg, Moses Soyer, Robert Indiana, Auguste Rodin, Georges Braque, Alex Katz,
Frederick Warren Freer and Irving Ramsey Wiles are some of the many artists included in
the collection.

The Formal Garden


One of the most breathtaking exhibitions of the Nassau County Museum of Art
was designed in the 1920’s by Marian Cruger Coffin, one of America’s leading landscape
architects. She designed this garden at the height of her career. Coffin’s overall plan for the
garden was to strengthen, clarify, and enhance the existing arrangement of walks, flower
beds, hedges, and entrances, using rectangles, circles, and arches to mirror the shapes
found in the symmetrical design of the estate’s mansion.
She also predicted that over time the garden would lose its beauty. In her efforts to
maintain her legacy, she taught the compositions of landscape architecture. Upon the
purchase of the estate in 1969, the garden was declared a public garden. Its maintenance
was dependent on private donations and volunteers.
The Roslyn Landmark Society, in 1989, restored the beautiful teak trellis, and in 1993,
extensive brick path restoration, including the restoration of the garden, which was funded
by New York State’s Environmental Quality Bond Act. Actual restoration of the garden began
in 2000.
In present day, the garden offers an elegant space to be admired by lovers of landscape
architecture. But most of all, a place to stroll, sit, and enjoy nature; a sanctuary of well
thought out reconstructed brick paths, perennial borders, and intricate boxwood designs in
four garden rooms, demarcated by yew “walls.” It is an ideal spot to be studied by historic
preservationists.

Sculpture Park


Nassau County Museum of Art’s Sculpture Park is considered one of the largest public
exhibition public parks in the Northeast. With around 40 sculptures, the majority of which
are permanent collections of the museum, lay well situated on the 145 acres of the Nassau
County Museum of Art.
Others include the prestigious venues such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the
Museum of Modern Art and many other galleries. Tom Otterness, Richard Serra, Mark di
Suvero, Manolo Valdes, Allen Bertoldi and Fernando Botero are just some of the artists
whose work is to be seen on the grounds.
Educational Programs
As part of the community, Nassau County Museum of Art provides a variety of educational
programs. The after-school program, for example, provides tours to the museum’s
exhibitions, and, customized workshops for specific interest groups can be arranged.
Another of the museum’s community outreach programs include the Autism & the Arts &
Creative Expeditions. The program was created in 2007, for the sole intention of
encouraging communication in children with autism.
Workshops are led by teaching artists, trained in art therapy, who encourage children with
autism to express themselves through conversations around works of art in their galleries,
and in hands on painting, drawing, and sculpture projects. The launch was made possible
through the collaboration between NCMA and the North Shore Autism Circle.
Visitor Information
Nassau County Museum of Art is located at One Museum Drive in Roslyn Harbor. Admission
to the main building is $12 for adults, $8 for seniors (62+), and $4 for children ages 4-12.
Hours for the main building are 11 am to 4:45 pm Tuesday through Sunday.
Docent-led tours of the main exhibition are offered at 2 pm each day; free with museum
admission. Meet in the lobby, no reservations are needed. Family art activities and tours are
offered Sundays from 1pm; free with museum admission. The Museum Store is open
Tuesday-Sunday, 11 am to 4:30 pm.  Visit www.nassaumuseum.org for more information.

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